NHS Prescriptions

Getting medication has just made easy. You can order your Repeat Medication on our online platform 24/7. Just fill the form with the medication that you require and leave the rest on us.

Electronic Prescription Services

A quicker and more convenient way to obtain your repeat prescriptions. The NHS Electronic Prescription Service gives you the chance to change how your GP sends your prescription to your pharmacy - by sending it electronically instead of the traditional paper-based method. Simply send your repeat electronic prescription request to us, once you’ve nominated our pharmacy, we’ll do the rest for you. Learn more


Order Your Repeat Prescriptions

You can choose us to be your nominated pharmacy to dispense and receive your repeat Prescriptions.

We Contact Your GP Surgery

We will contact your GP surgery and ask them to get us your repeat medication prescription.

We will dispense your medication

Once we receive your medication prescription we will dispense it according to your prescription.

Ready for Collection Or Delivery

Your medication is ready for collection as per your request or Deliver. We will also send you notification to let you know.

If you need a repeat prescription urgently, call your GP. If you cannot speak to your GP practice, call NHS 111.

Prescription Delivery Service

If you cannot get to us then we can come to you! We can deliver your medicines to your home free of charge(subject to fair milege from . You will not have to go to the surgery to pick up your prescription (if you are on our Repeat Prescription Service). We will make sure that your surgery knows you are using this service. You will not have to wait while your prescription is being dispensed. We will make up your medicines and then bring them to you.

Prescription Charges and Exemptions

Who can get free prescriptions

You can get free NHS prescriptions if, at the time the prescription is dispensed, you:

  • are 60 or over
  • are under 16are 16 to 18 and in full-time education
  • are pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months and have a valid maternity exemption certificate (MatEx)
  • have a specified medical condition and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • have a continuing physical disability that prevents you going out without help from another person and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • hold a valid war pension exemption certificate and the prescription is for your accepted disability
  • are an NHS inpatient

You're also entitled to free prescriptions if you or your partner (including civil partner) receive, or you're under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving:

  • Income Support
  • income-based Jobseeker's Allowance
  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Pension Credit Guarantee Credit
  • Universal Credit and meet the criteria

If you're entitled to or named on:

  • a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate – if you do not have a certificate, you can show your award notice. You qualify if you get Child Tax Credits, Working Tax Credits with a disability element (or both), and have income for tax credit purposes of £15,276 or less
  • a valid NHS certificate for full help with health costs (HC2)

People named on an NHS certificate for partial help with health costs (HC3) may also get help.

Check you're eligible for free prescriptions

There's a simple way to find out if you're eligible for free NHS prescriptions and any help with other NHS costs.

Use the eligibility checker.

Free prescriptions for certain medical conditions

You can get free NHS prescriptions if, at the time the prescription is dispensed, you:

  • are 60 or over
  • are under 16are 16 to 18 and in full-time education
  • are pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months and have a valid maternity exemption certificate (MatEx)
  • have a specified medical condition and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • have a continuing physical disability that prevents you going out without help from another person and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • hold a valid war pension exemption certificate and the prescription is for your accepted disability
  • are an NHS inpatient

You're also entitled to free prescriptions if you or your partner (including civil partner) receive, or you're under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving:

  • Income Support
  • income-based Jobseeker's Allowance
  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Pension Credit Guarantee Credit
  • Universal Credit and meet the criteria

If you're entitled to or named on:

  • a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate – if you do not have a certificate, you can show your award notice. You qualify if you get Child Tax Credits, Working Tax Credits with a disability element (or both), and have income for tax credit purposes of £15,276 or less
  • a valid NHS certificate for full help with health costs (HC2)

People named on an NHS certificate for partial help with health costs (HC3) may also get help.

NHS prescription charges

Most adults in England have to pay prescription charges.

Some items are always free, including contraceptives and medicines prescribed for hospital inpatients.

The current prescription charge is £9.65 per item as of 1st April 2023.

A prescription prepayment certificate (PPC) could save you money on NHS prescription costs 3-month PPC costs £31.25 and 12-month PPC is £111.60

There's a simple way to find out if you're eligible for free NHS prescriptions and any help with other NHS costs.

Find out how to save money with a PPC

People with certain medical conditions can get free NHS prescriptions.

Medical exemption certificates are credit-card-size cards. They are issued if you have:

  • cancer, including the effects of cancer or the effects of current or previous cancer treatment
  • a permanent fistula (for example, a laryngostomy, colostomy, ileostomy or some renal dialysis fistulas) requiring continuous surgical dressing or an appliance
  • a form of hypoadrenalism (for example, Addison's disease) for which specific substitution therapy is essential
  • diabetes insipidus or other forms of hypopituitarism
  • diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone
  • hypoparathyroidism
  • myasthenia gravis
  • myxoedema (hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement)
  • epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive therapy
  • a continuing physical disability that means you cannot go out without the help of another person (temporary disabilities do not count, even if they last for several months)

Find out more about medical exemption certificates.